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FEAST OF SIMON AND JUDE, APOSTLES

Obscure but still important

Much of what we know about apostles Jude and Simon is who they are not. Simon was called the Zealot—someone passionate, and perhaps revolutionary, about his Jewish faith. Calling him the Zealot also helped to distinguish him from the more famous Simon Peter. We find Jude (along with Judas, variant translations of the name Judah) mentioned in the list of the apostles in Luke and Acts, but he is called Thaddeus in Matthew and Mark, perhaps to distinguish him from the traitor Judas Iscariot. Regardless of their relative obscurity, Jude and Simon were chosen by Jesus to share the Good News and there is every indication they did just that. Even if your life seems quiet and unremarkable to you in some ways, the call to discipleship is your call as well. Saint Jude and Saint Simon, pray for us.

Today's readings: Ephesians 2:19-22; Luke 6:12-16 (666). “Jesus called the disciples to himself. . . . Simon who was called the Zealot and Judas the son of James.” ... See MoreSee Less

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Deacon’s Bench:
We are chosen by Christ to build up a sacred temple to the Lord. Our foundation is the Apostles and prophets, with Christ as the cap stone. Through Christ this whole structure, called the church is held together. Each of us has a responsibility and the talents to construct different parts of this temple. It is not made of stone but rather of bodies and souls which can make a holy dwelling place for us with the Holy Spirit. We can acclaim the glorious company of the apostles and saints forming one large community in glorifying God. Every struggle and challenge we face is one which helps us do our part of this temple.

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Deacon’s Bench:
Compassion and reverence toward every person are the way of Christ. Especially among husbands and wives. The family and the community should be respectful of each other that we might all share in the love of Christ. Since our creation with Adam and Eve, we are one family. We must suffer and die because of our ancestor’s sins, as well as our own, but through Christ, together we are invited to share in eternal life with God. Prejudice and racism should not exist among the family. Christ’s message is that we are just that, one family of Christ. World peace can be achieved through the mission of Christ.

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Slow down, you’re moving too fast

Too many people work too much. Some have a psychological compulsion to work incessantly. Some work excessively to acquire money and success. Some have no identity outside of their jobs. Some are driven by guilt and fear of being lazy. Some think that an overly busy work life makes them look important. And far too many are forced to work too much in order to make ends meet. None of these reasons are healthy or holy. God wants us to rest and enjoy life too—thus, the sabbath day. Let’s work together to create a just society where all can get some rest.

Today's readings: Ephesians 4:32—5:8; Luke 13:10-17 (479). “Ought she not to have been set free on the sabbath day from this bondage?” ... See MoreSee Less

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Deacon’s Bench:
Forgive one another as God has forgiven you through the love of Jesus Christ. No obscenities, suggestive talk, or silliness is appropriate for those who are holy. We should only be thankful and kind to others; always forgiving, for it is in forgiving that we ourselves are healed. Revenge never brings healing or peace to the one who is hurt. Cruelty that is placed on some, cannot be healed until the injured one forgives and prays for the betterment of their enemy. It is this act of love toward our enemy that heals ourselves. When we pray for those who hurt us, we actually can begin to heal ourselves.

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3 days ago

Holy Redeemer Catholic Church

Mass Livestream at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church. New Bremen OH
Multistreaming with Castr.io
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Deacon’s Bench:
Christ renews His love for each of us each day. He knows that we are dependent upon His love for every new day. God knows we can not survive without Him and yet He awaits our study and prayer to fill in the blanks. If we stay connected to His church, we can build the body of Christ for those who still do not understand the love of Christ. It is our mission to fill with love our hearts to comprehend the strength of Christ’s words. We can only learn the fullness of Christ’s love by sharing His love and experiencing each other’s loves and struggles. It is the sum total of all our experiences that can bring us the fullness of God. We can only receive this through prayer and the sacraments.

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MEMORIAL OF JOHN PAUL II, POPE

Small acts can have great impact

Saint John Paul II’s quarter-century as pope greatly influenced both church and state. Many times his personal witness is what moved people’s hearts. Christians and those of other faiths alike were moved by his willingness to meet with his would-be assassin, Mehmet Ali Ağca. While most people’s lives are not lived on the world stage, each of us can bear witness through acts of love, forgiveness, and reverence. What gesture of yours today can bear witness to God?

Today's readings: Ephesians 3:14-21; Luke 12:49-53 (476). “I have come to set the earth on fire, and how I wish it were already blazing!” ... See MoreSee Less

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MEMORIAL OF PAUL OF THE CROSS, PRIEST

How deep is your love?

Paul of the Cross, Italian mystic and founder of the Passionist religious order in 1725, was taught by his mother to look to the crucified Jesus as a way to make sense out of suffering. Most of his siblings died; his father’s business barely scraped by. But no matter what hardships the family endured, his mother said, they were nothing compared to God’s deep love. What a seed she planted in her son! “The holy sufferings of Jesus is a sea of sorrows, but it is also a sea of love,” wrote Paul. “Ask the Lord to teach you to fish in this sea.”

Today's readings: Ephesians 2:12-22; Luke 12:35-38 (474). “Be like servants who await their master’s return from a wedding, ready to open.” ... See MoreSee Less

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Deacon’s Bench:
Give thanks to the Lord for He has given us many riches. The Lord has made us in His image, and we owe Him everything. His Son Jesus Christ has redeemed us by His sacrifice, when we did not know Him, and now, we can finally make things right. Thanks to God that we do not have to pay Him what we owe Him but rather what we are able. He is faithful for all time; thus, we are secure. His gifts will not be taken from us. He has raised us up with His Son. We are His beneficiaries of immeasurable grace. It is a gift from God. We do not deserve the rewards we have received, but if we love God and neighbor that is enough.

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MEMORIAL OF JOHN DE BRÉBEUF AND ISAAC JOGUES, PRIESTS, AND COMPANIONS, MARTYRS

Heal the breach

Jean de Brébeuf was a French Jesuit missionary who worked with the Huron in what is today Canada and was martyred in an Iroquois raid. Brébeuf was a skilled linguist and not only learned the Huron language but also the spiritual beliefs already held by the Huron. His fellow Jesuits wrote about how easily Brébeuf adapted himself to the Huron way of life. While he was not always respectful of Huron culture, we can emulate his effort to create bridges of mutual understanding, as our own country is today torn by differences.

Today's readings: Ephesians 2:1-10; Luke 12:13-21 (473). “You fool, this night your life will be demanded of you; and the things you have prepared, to whom will they belong?” ... See MoreSee Less

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